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be scientists. there is all this talk about we have to do the recording to the science. while the talks might begin moving at a snail's pace -- like a caravan stuck in a sandstorm. everyone seems to be breaking your neck to get far away from the sides as possible. the world is already here. and whether the u.s. or any other country, including my own andhey are living in it -- i would hope maybe their kids would turn around and tell their parents, haven't you noticed? we are already there. >> that was ronny jumeau of the seychelles. before that, you heard jonathan pershing, the chief climate change negotiator. so far, the u.s. envoy tod stern has only held one news conference after one week and half. he was goodlett told another one today, but if you look at today's list of meetings, the event is the only one marked in red. a press conference was cancelled. ronny jumeau is with us here in doha, representative of the alliance of small island states. and we are joined by martin khor, executive director of the south centre in malaysia. ambassador, you're on the panel with the jonathan pershing, t
in the fields of engineering, science, and math -- you dig, the numbers are fairly is stunning. -- fairly stunning. roughly 44% of graduates are in those skills. europe is at 24%. i say this respectfully, and i know we are on c-span. when the your pants -- the europeans are outpacing us, in these key fields that will drive innovation, then you know we are in trouble. i would correct one comment. there have been at some of us, chris coons and marco rubio, we have put forward legislation long before the election that said, let's look at this talent competition issue. let's put forward an approach that many of us, those of us that have been from the business world, have been talking about for decades. let's recognize that while we need to do more to prime the pump in terms of science and engineering or math graduates, native-born americans, particularly focusing on losing the numbers in middle school where girls and children of college had enormous challenges, that is something we will have to come back to. we also have to continue to attract talent from around the world. one of the ways tha
long- range basic science and basic research areas, which support all of these innovations as a platform, if you will. government investment in basic science for example, in biotechnology and genomics, has created a whole new growth industry where the u.s. is the world leader. those are examples where the government and industry together both can do things which help build our economic future. > the book holds some fascinating insights. "producing prosperity" it is called. willy shee, one of the authors. thank you so much. > > thank you bill. still ahead, rebuilding the housing market by fixing the foreclosure crisis. an update is coming up next. when we decided to update ourselves on the foreclosure process in america, we didn't have to search very far. chicago ranks 3rd in the nation compared to other cities. by state, it's california, michigan, texas, and georgia leading the way with the most completed foreclosures this year. joining us on set this morning is mary jones. she is the executive director agora community services. good morning to you. > > good morning. thank
in the last five years. >> well, there have been major events. what's unusual about this event in science history is it's occurred in a narrow window and across a very broad front. it's not one technology. it's the fact that we can sequence genomes, your entire genome profile in a few hours with a few hundred dollars which took billions of dollars and a decade. we have the ability to analyze those data through very statistical computations structures and artificial intelligence. >> so if i look at it. you show me a machine that now sequences dnas, the size of a large refrigerator. that is now more powerful than -- much more powerful than a machine five years ago? >> well, that machine in nine days, a 24/7 run, one machine could exceed the data generation of all of the machines in the u.s. in the year 2007. >> you also talk about how computing has become not only faster but much more sophisticat sophisticated. >> the most exciting is artificial intelligence. we're a third artificial intelligence where computers can think. they can think in a text real way where computers can help us make d
? >> thanks, jess. >>> learning what science tastes like. >> chemistry in the kitchen, you bet. cool schools is coming up next. >>> howard here with your weather first. you'll need the heavy coats. down to the 20s in a few spots. it will be a sharply colder day, sunny with a few afternoon clouds here and there. lunch time temperature of 43. we'll only top out in the mid- 40s. i'll be back with a warmer weekend forecast in just a few minutes. >>> owward on the northbound side of 395, we've been telling you about an accident sitting on the shoulder north of duke street but before seminary road. more equipment has arrived on the scene. now original the two left lanes get through. expect delays as you come up from springfield. coming up in my next report, i'll also explain a situation going on in bethesda on the beltway at 6:18. back to you guys. >>> thursday morning cool schools time is here. we this morning are learning what science tastes like. the students in d.c. did their lab work on location. they went to a place where molecules and a master chef made for a tasty lesson. >> reporter: love
are absolute low right. what you see happening right now, dana is the art of politics and verse us the science of good policy. we need to move away from campaign mode and stimulate economic growth and wealth expansion and not wealth distribution. when the president is focused on the wealth distribution politic which thomas jefferson and hamilton lincoln talked against we are headed on down the wrong path. more people are pushed to food stamps and more people pushed to poverty and unemployment situation is going to get worse. we have seen that recently with the weekly job claims numbers coming out. >> and one of the things that are part of the debate and since the carter administration is the need to reform entitlements and make social security is set on a path and available to children and grandchildren that are born today. >> it seems to me that cram -- congressman that entitlements are not part of the discussion but do you think it should be. >> it has to be. it is troubling when the president is ordering the expansion of government and increase of tax rates, but he's not talking about the t
that, but on the theological debate, that's how do you reconcile with science definitively establishes what your what faith teaches? with the age of the earth, there's no conflict. in the beginning, god created the heavens and earth, and the scientific advances allowed us, given us insight into when and how he did it, but i believe god did it. that's how i reconcile that. that's consistent with the teachings of my church. other people have a deeper con flipght. i think in america, we should have the freedom to teach our children whatever we believe, and that means teaching them science. they have to know science, but parents have the right to teach theology and reconcile the two things as they believe and see fit, and i think that's the point the president was making back in 2007 when he was asked the question. that's what i was saying. >> accepting that, how old is the earth? >> science says it's -- my faith teaches it's not inconsistent, but god great created the universe. god creates help and earth, and science gives us insight. the more science learned, the more i'm convinced that
in south florida as great a strain folks at entry point, there is science and progress of human trafficking. awareness part is important. they have to take the place when the internet for law enforcement because a lot of times they find themselves into prostitution and get treated as perpetrator rather than victims. if ecologists force them into a perpetrator but in fact we are the dems and they have to give him for certain judicial system to treat a women as victims and put them in a setting with a pull themselves away from drug addiction or whatever it's supposed appendices seem to keep them trapped. >> first i want to ask you a couple twitter questions that have come in what we've been talking here. one is who's the best meter in washington? >> robert griffing. [laughter] >> why did the majority of americans reject the republican party? >> i think it was an election. it was a very close election when he looked than others and differences between. there is their free enterprise may maintain we need to improve on the way they connect those policies of the everyday life of everyday people.
. and for those who are unfamiliar with the term "stem" it stands for science, technology, engineering, and math. the hard sciences that we have too few in terms of graduates from our colleges and universities. this bill passed in the house of representatives with 245 votes, and was originally sponsored by my friend and colleague, lamar smith of texas, and is very similar to a piece of legislation i myself have introduced earlier this year. the goal of this legislation is one that i think is -- enjoys broad bipartisan support, and that is to help the united states retain more of the highly skilled immigrants who come to study at our colleges and universities. in particular, this bill would make eligible for a green card those who graduate in the stem fields who get a master's degree or a ph.d. and so we would not add to the net number of green cards that would be eligible, there is 55,000 diversity lottery visa green cards that would be substituted for by these stem green cards. now, we all know that america's immigration system is broken, and, unfortunately, it's a self-inflicted wound in many
do you reconcile what science has established what what you may think your faith teaches. when it comes to the age of the earth, there is no conflict. god created the heavens and the earth and scientific advances has given us insight. but i believe he has done it. and i have reconciled that. but other people have a deeper thought. in america, we should have the freedom to teach our children whatever it is we believe and that means teaching them science. but also parents have the right to teach them theology and reconcile those two things as they see fit. that's the point the president was making back in 2007. so that's what i was saying. >> accepting that context, household is the earth? >> -- how old is the fourth, four and a half billion years old. god created it out of nothing. and science has given us insight as to how and when he did it. and the more science learns the more i'm convinced that god is real. >> you have had a very fascinating faith journey. you were baptized catholic and mormon and later to the catholic church. >> maybe i'm a theologian. and you go to mass an
is what about the science shows it is. but he's doing this interesting thing where he's claiming to say the same thing that obama said about this. what obama was asked about was how do you explain to your daughters that you know, you're a christian. christianity said it took six days for the earth to be created. how do you explain that to your daughters. obama went on a theological question, we don't know how long six days is. i believe in the science obama has said millions of times, we should teach geology and evolution in science class and if you want to teach intelligent design and other theories, do it in religion class. and the important part with rubio is while he does seem to be tempering his first line now with mike allen yesterday after he got a lot of criticism for it he still believes fundamentally that you should teach creationism alongside evolution in classes. that's really where this comes from. his history when he was in florida as a state house speaker was a huge fight over evolution education in
foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: with 25 days left until the year-end fiscal cliff, and just 19 days until christmas, president obama warned lawmakers today not to add to the holiday pressures americans already feel, by letting the political stalemate drag on. but he also again insisted there would be no deal unless tax rates went up on the wealthy. >> the closer it gets to the brink, the more stressed we're going to be. >> woodruff: president obama made the short trip to northern virginia today to underline his plan to avert the fiscal cliff. at the home of what the white house called a typical middle class family, mr. obama said he's optimistic that agreement can be reached, but again drew a hard line for republicans in congress. >> everybody's is going to have
. >> the gifts parents can buy now that will make the kids go crazy on christmas morning. the science of picking the right toy. as a parent, i can tell you. look at that. so excited. nothing like seeing that unabashed joy on your child's face. this is all? >> christmas is about the kids and those moments right there. do we lose it as we get older? >> totally. >> here is your gift card. first, the major concerns among u.s. leaders about the civil war still raging in syria. reports say clashes between government forces and rebels are flaring around the capital of damascus. >> concerns are escalating abut possible use of chemical weapons, a step president obama warned syria not to take. abc's martha raddatz has more. >> reporter: hillary clinton overseas trying to find some diplomatic way to end this increasingly dangerous conflict. 20 months of fighting, 40,000 lives lost, and now the chilling possibility of an air attack with deadly nerve agents. >> there is no question that we remain very concerned that the regime might very well consider the use of chemical weapons. >> reporter: a senior u.s. o
out? a new report by the national academy of science says the agency has no solid plan for the future. that report blames the president for the lack of direction, but it goes on to say nasa has not done enough to accomplish the obama administration's goal of sending astronauts to an astroid. a former nasa scientist says he's never seen the agency so utterly unfocused. >>> the holidays are finally here and one of the fixtures of the season happens tomorrow night. erica grow with a preview of the lighting of the national christmas tree. >> the first lady and tree will be where? >> reporter: the national park foundation is ready to give you a tree lighting ceremony you won't soon forget. the national tree is brand-new just planted in october and it's been prepped for tomorrow's spectacular display from top to bottom. >> we work on it all year long and now is crunch time. this is the 90th anniversary of the tree lighting. we'll have over 20,000 people here tomorrow night watching a live show. >> and the first lady of the united states of america. >> reporter: the stage is set for a spec
family and friends, everything that you love all in the name of science. >>> "newsroom" starts now. >>> good morning. thank you so much for being with me. i'm carol costello. this should be interesting. speaker john boehner meets this morning with house republicans who are angry at his new pitch to raise $800 billion in tax revenue in the fiscal cliff negotiations. president obama has said there will be no deal unless taxes are raised on the wealthiest americ americans. but staunch conservatives don't want any kind of new taxes. that's where speaker boehner's job gets really tough. on piers morgan tonight newt gingrich said if all else fails, go over the cliff. >> i think that no deal is better than a bad deal. i think going off this cliff is less dangerous than letting things build up for a year or two years to an even bigger cliff. i think that the president clearly has staked out a position of nonseriousness. and i think that it's very difficult for the house republicans right now to find any practical way to get his attention. so, he just won an election. he is feeling very goo
of the chinese academy of social sciences said china's economy would grow 7.7% this year, which is down 1.6% from last year. >> translator: china's exports are slowing because of the european debt crisis and the global economic slow-down. >> he said the chinese economy bottomed out in the july to september quarter. that's because industrial output and consumption improved in both september and october. he predicts the country's economic growth will recover to about 8.2% next year from public investment expansion and monetary easing measures. but he called for flexible government policies if the situation in europe worsens. the chinese government earlier this year revised its growth target to 7.5% from around 8% in preceding years. >>> over in the united states, president barack obama is urging republicans to approve a tax hike on the wealthy. he says this is needed to avert the impending fiscal cliff of automatic austerity measures that could drag the economy into recession. obama said on wednesday that federal revenues will not reach the level needed to implement his proposals to cut the deficit
what this does for this region. you know the bay area has become the blue angels of science. we do lots of stunts, and we are very successful at doing those stunts and we do them at high speeds, and between this project and the project for cal train to electifiy it over the next seven years $3 billion is going to be spent regionally on transit here, and we can say thank you to the secretary of transportation and to the regional transit authorities who have create thursday opportunity for the transportation. >> >> that will create a 22nd century of transit for the tronst century of jobs so thank you to secretary lahood and thank you to the leadership for all that we have accomplished here today. [applause] >> peter rogof was dominated to serve in the federal administration by the department of transportation in 2009 by president barack obama. he has over see the disbursement throughout the country through the american reinvestment act and has done so meeting every milestone established by that act. getting money into hands of transit operators whose budgets were severely strained
. the real obstacle to job growth is having the best education system, particularly in the s.t.e.m. sciences. we implement many of the environmental policies. where the rubber hits the road is that you have to get results. the reason we are winning races is that we have democratic governors who not only balance budgets and understand they have to be fiscally responsible but we combine that with an imaginative vision on insuring that we get it right when it comes to technology, making sure we have a trained work force so that we can be the job creators and the folks that seem incomes rise -- see incomes rise. when we talk to candidates, we go for the job creators. >> when you look specifically to the 2014 elections, especially in the midwestern states where republicans have a pretty large victories in 2010, what is your overarching argument against those republican governors? they have led to charges that that anger the democratic base. will that be the basis of your message to unseating some of those governors? >> here is the state that produces the automobiles for america that with out pres
in the journal environmental science and technology found stuffing in more than 100 sophomore f hu00 the country found that 85% contained potentially hazard downs chemicals. >> they're coming out of the couches into air and dropping into dust. >> reporter: these chemicals were first used to meet requirements in california saying that the upholstery must sustain a flame for 15 seconds. among the chemicals found where were pbdes, voluntarily phased out in 2004 after the epa expressed concern that they were toxic to both humans and the environment. and a toxic ban from children's sleep wear in the 1970s. an environmental advocacy group found the tests it commissioned found high levels of tris in 16 upholstered products. but the midwesteamerican chemis counsel say that it provides time -- a furniture trade group says it's not aware of any evidence including in the sofa study linking the retard ands in furniture as a home health problem. additional research is needed for the sole purpose of meeting california's strict standards. the treadway's say for them, finding this ecofriendly douch was worth it
isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritre. >> i have your fox business brief. manufacturing activity unexpectedly contracted last month falling to its lowest level in three years. it fell to 49.5. larger than expected drop. on the flip side, you as builders boosted their construction spending in october by their largest about sids may. it rose nearly 1.5. morningstar foods unit is being sold for $1.5 billion. the deal will help boost its presence in the u.s. it operates and manufacturing facilities in nine states. that is the latest from the fox business network. giving you the power to prosper. ♪ lori: microsoft hoping to take a bite out of apple's ipad business. more than customers can swallow. connell: shibani joshi has more of that in the newsroom. >> some of the key features, there was one piece of information we did not know until just recently. that is probably the most important piece of information. that is the price tag. whether or not the company shot itself in the foot even before the 64 gigabyte is 899.vices. the workhorse device is 999. just to
science. it's st comm sense. from td ameritrade. melissa: so a couple of warning signs for microsoft as new data paints a not so rosy picture for the tech giant and its new tablet. shibani joshi joins us with all the details. >> melissa, i will broaden the discussion here showing that even the stock prices already heeding these warning signs getting picked up by technology experts and data points out there. if you look at microsoft shares over the last three months, they are down 13%. just in the last month down about 10%. that's because the high hopes that microsoft is pinning on windows 8 and its new tablet lineup may not be panning out as the company has hoped. we got new data out from npd. just yesterday showing us windows 8 sales aren't doing sort of the revival of the pc industry, aren't contributing to the revival of the pc industry as many people haa expected. in fact, npd has said that pc sales, remember, everyone thought windows 8 would come out, pcs, the overall industry would get a boost, they're actually down 21% in the first four weeks of windows 8 being available. comp
of students. computer science class saw a man on a rampage take out a teacher. that teacher saved lives in the very last moments of his life. >> and neighborhoods evacuated. people forced to wait out a toxic situation after a train derailment sends hazardous chim -- chemicals in the air and ground. a new theory of what led to a chain of rail cars jumping off of the track. take a look. um... uh... um... hm... umm... uh... oh ! the windows phone 8x by htc on verizon. it features easy to navigate live tiles that are simple to customize. just pin what matters most right to your homescreen. exclusively with data sense-- a feature that makes the most of you plan. only on verizon. now we need a little bit more... [ male announcer ] at humana, we understand the value of quality time and personal attention. which is why we are proud to partner with health care professionals who understand the difference that quality time with our members can make... that's a very nice cake! ohh! [ giggles ] [ male announcer ] humana thanks the physicians, nurses, hospitals, pharmacists and other health professio
: interesting you say that. france found out they are performing worse than the americans in reading and science. >> andrea: the youth unemployment is 25%. this is with homework. okay? if you take away the homework, what does it go up to? this is classic socialism. this is not about personal responsibility. everyone starts out the same but you can't determine theout come. this, they want to determine the outcome even if it's punitive. >> bob: the idea that the big kids do homework. when they are six years old, seven, eight, nine, ridiculous. >> dana: greg? >> greg: i'm with andrea. it's the expectation of outcome opposed to opportunity. high expectations are now perceived as being mean-spirited. sometimes bigoted. we are lowering our expectations of our people. as we expect more from the product. impoint. over time we no longer have the great products that we have. what do you do instead of homework? the point of homework keep you alive through childhood. because you are supposed to give them childhood to adulthood. only way is to stay indoors. >> eric: stay indoors dand homework? >> you are wat
. they produce products that and for public opinion, she policies, and advanced science, engineering, and madison. that question is complicated, and nrc leaders put together a panel of people that represented a broad range of disciplines. they convene the leaders from business and industry, academy, and government and the national laboratories. i had the privilege of being a member of that panel. because congress asked for 10 actions that to be taken to shore up universities, restructured our report around 10 recommendations with a time frame of the next 5-10 years. one recommendation focused on policies affecting the flow of international scholars and students to the u.s. more and more international students are inclined to come to our research universities. uva has had a 60% increase in such applications in the last three years alone. that has been fueled largely by applications from chinese students. the u.s. benefits when talented students and faculty come to the country to study and conduct research. the benefit even more if they stay in the u.s. to work after they graduate. it is in our nat
.5 billion. doug mcelway has the story. >> we realize it is the stuff of science fiction. we intend to make it science fact. >> it would appear too incredible. except these former nasa managers are credible and experienced. calling their project golden spike. they planned to send man back to the moon within a decade on commercial spacecraft at a cost of $7 billion to $8 billion. >> our vision is to create a reliable and affordable u.s. base imher shall -- commercial trans transportation system. it is from virtually any nation or any corporation. or any individual. >> reporter: -- >> for many robotic missions they know the moon is tapping. >> it is rich in platinum and other elements of exotic value are there in huge quantity. >> helium 3 which does not exist in sufficient quantities on earth is plentiful on the moon. it could be mined and returned to earth to provide fuel for nuclear fusion which unlining the fission powered reactors leaves little radio active waste. >> and liftoff. >> extreme frugality is factored into the planning. >> adapt crew capsules that are already in development. o
of the center for science in the public terest said, "overdoing caffeine alone is actually pretty difficult to do. someone would have to make an effort to nsume 40 or so 200-mg caffeine tablets." or... about thisuch 5-hour energy... in a single day. we recomme... not more than two per day. yeah, when we fit came out with the product.. you know, i made sure of o thing. if my family wasn' going tose it... if it wasn't good enough for myamily if it wasn't safe for my f family... i'm not gonna put it out there. i take it almost every day. and twice when i play tennis. this is ouiter that we have to be safe... if we're not willing to dit ourselves... we're not askiking anybody elseo do it. we're not gonna se it. so, that's our approach toafety... that is a higher standard you can get. >> many companies are trying to take their money and run huge firms. ralph nader a big critic of many corporations and a move like this, ralph, what do you think? this is not a shock given what they are facing? >> this has been going on for a long time, with transfer pricing they stash cash overseas, sometimes in c
, in the chemical laboratory, in the health science room, they broke a vial that had some of it in it. they evacuated that school. the fire department came in with all kinds of equipment to make sure they were not exposed to it. women who are pregnant, they say don't eat fish that has mercury in it and they cautioned them, the that there is surgeonfish you can eat. there are all kinds of reasons not to be exposed to mercury. yet we continue to put it in vaccinations as a preservative. in 1929, they came up with for marisol. they tested it on 29 people who had meningitis. they all died of meningitis, but the the mercury in the vaccination was not a contributing factor. so since 1929, it has never been completely tested and they continue to use it in vaccinations. it was not so bad when wenchow got a vaccination or two or three. but now they -- when one child got a vaccination or two or three. but now they get 29. the brain tissues to not -- it stays in there and it causes severe problems. during my chairmanship, for six years, we had four years of hearings. we had people from all of th
-- it is like a science filmstrip. >> we were saying that for some reason, it is always such great timing politically because the republicans inevitably are acting like jerks at christmastime. here we go with the fiscal cliff and the debt and now they vote down the disabilities act right in front of bob dole in a real wheelchair. we're just like wow. >> absolutely. if anyone wants to make a music video using this song as the background alluding to all of that stuff you're talking about you know, i'm not going to say no. >> stephanie: there you go. >> i can't speak for viacom's lawyers. >> stephanie: no. >> but i'm not going to say no. >> stephanie: here's a fun fact. co-wrote ten of the album songs. who is so handsome and rowic and talented. >> thank you. >> don't be a jerk dates from 2009. the joe wilson thing was happening. it just seemed like rudeness and you know, the lack of manners and civil discourses breaking down. you know, my cowriter, andy and i came up with this phrase, how about a song don't be a
of our own problem getting our own students excited in science and engineering. if we could cut the atransition rate of students in science and engineering, we could meet many of our need in the united states for stem workers. so i think it's important that we have the trust if we address the high skilled immigration issue, we don't do that as a substitute for looking at all these other issue that is still need work. your question ends up being do i trust that congress will do something and track vord not too good. >> one thing i want to say in response to senator warner who i agree with almost all the time which he said the election was a size mick shift. i think it's important that both sides don't overplay their hand. i understand the democratic side of president obama winning reelection and by a pretty significant electoral margin. it also was clear if you looked at the data that the reason for that predominantly was the latino vote. indeed one statistic if mitt romney had gotten the same percentage of latino vote george w. bush got he probably would have won. you have to ge
people sort of live those years? >> absolutely. medical science has been so great. you mentioned novartis earlier. they're on the cutting edge of figuring out therapies that will work for people like me. so, for example, in my treatment, the first medicine i took called. >> glivac wasn't working the way i wanted it to. i changed to the next generation drug and it worked very well. it has given me what is called the molecular response, which means i no longer have any bad white blood cells that can be detected in my body down to the molecular level. that's the type of response that we want to reach and hope to maintain. >> you know in the three years since being diagnosed, what has been your biggest breakthrough personally or with respect to treatment? and how the treatments happened. >> i think personally once people found out i had leukemia, it made me a lot more human to people. when you're a successful athlete, people think you can do anything at anytime. and when they find out you're susceptible to the same things that every other ordinary person is susceptible to, it kind of humanize
him, and he'll set money aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. [♪ theme music ♪] >> announcer: ladies and gentlemen, it's the "stephanie miller show"! ♪ i'm walking on sunshine woe ho ♪ ♪ i'm walking on sunshine woe ho ♪ ♪ it's time to feel good ♪ ♪ hey, all right now ♪ ♪ it's time to feel good ♪ >> stephanie: it is the "stephanie miller show." welcome to it. six minutes after the hour. 1-800-steph-1-2 the phone number toll free from anywhere. charlie pierce from esquire.com coming up at the bottom of the hour. sexyliberal.com the sexy liberal website, sexy liberal on facebook, get tickets. d.c. sexy liberal show january 19th. there are only five vip tickets left now. >> as of 15 minutes ago there were two left. >> stephanie: oh dear. i think three quarters of the orchestra already gone, so hurry. we have been talking about the fiscal cliff, it is like we can just dial back to last summer and yet what has hand since this then [♪ "jeopardy" theme music ♪] >>
to the upside. investors missed it. this documenthe stock then begio freefall of a series of bad news in science perhaps the tragedy is not working. melissa: it is like a palm. charles: september 2012, deficient in knowledge, the stock rebounds. this is ron johnson, the guy who invented the genius bar. november 2012, this guy gives a sort of talks to the industry, everybody says i have a strategy, know what works, the stock tumbles, craters to $16 per share. bringing us to today. it is not confirmed, but maybe ron johnson is leaving the company. think about that for a moment of the stock is up on strong volume. just imaaine that. for the craziest reason of all going back a few years ago. melissa: what was the nauseous? >> missing the rally. lori: what is a good color tomorrow? sandracharles: what was the colf the year this year? melissa: tangerine? charles: of course. melissa: i am lucky. lori: i've never even heard that be described as a color. charles: tangerine. all right. lori: let's check the market with nicole watching wall street. nicole: watching green. looking at men's warehouse. a comp
what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. [ engine revs ] ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] the mercedes-benz winter event is back, with the perfect vehicle that's just right for you, no matter which list you're on. [ santa ] ho, , ho, ho! [ male announcer ] lease a 2013 c250 for $349 a month at your local mercedes-benz dealer. at your local music is a universal langue. but when i was in an accident. i was worried the health care system spoke a language all i own with unitedhealthcare, i got help that fit my life. information on my phone. connection to doctors who get where i'm from. d tools to estimate what my care may cost. so i never missed a beat. we're more than 78,000 people looking out for more than 70 million ericans. that's health in numbebers. unitedhealthcare. ♪ >> all right. we've got the adp report on private sector employment. only 118,000 jobs created in november. that's in the the private sector, okay? however, clearly that was affected by the big storm, sa y sandy. should have been much higher and will have been much higher w
. >> clayton: in new york city, women waiting until they're 50 to get married or have kids, beyond science or-- >> right, right. >> clayton: is that a problem? and is marriage the traditional idea of marriage suffering because women want to go further and further into the workplace? >> the idea of traditional marriage is suffering for lot of reason. the article, wasn't the whole kit and caboodle, one aspect that i was passing on, if you will. there's certainly more to the issue, the purpose of my book, how to choose a husband. this was sort after teaser. but the whole attitude for marriage in general, for young people in particular is such a negative one and that's really the premise that i'm concerned about because when you start out thinking so negatively and taught things like never depend on a man and postpone marriage as long as possible. not that there's anything wrong with postponing it, but with that attitude you're probably going to have a self-fulfilling prophesy, but turn it around. this is a good thing. marriage, family-- >> governor huckabee on our show disagreed a little. >> oka
another crack at that science question. clarify an answer he gave to "gq" when he was asked about the age of the earth. remember, senator rubio took a little grief, saying that he was not qualified to answer the question, calling it, quote, one of life's great mysteries. remember, i'm not a scientist, man, the whole thing. yesterday, mike, i guess you spoke to him as part of the "playbook" breakfast and you gave him a chance to explain that answer. let's listen. >> how old do you think the earth is? >> first of all, the answer i gave was trying to make the same point the president made a few years ago, and that is there is no scientific debate on the age of the earth. i mean, it's established it. pretty definitively. at least 4.5 billion years old. i was referring to a theological debate which is a pretty healthy debate. >> mike, what did you come away with talking to marco rubio yesterday? >> people in the room came away thinking that he was really smooth, really on his game. and this is an example of that. he had that very clumsy sort of dismissive answer when he was asked by "gq" befor
was alive long enough to struggle with his son so six students in the computer science class can get out. local police touted him as a hero in a press conference yesterday. >> stepped into the classroom where the professor was getting ready to begin the day. fired one arrow and struck the professor in the head. professor crumb got up after being knocked down and even though mortally wounded, he fought the suspect off. the students in the room were all able to escape during this altercation because of the courage of the professor. >> now, earlier we got a statement from casper community college. they told us jim crumb and heidi arnold were important parts of the campus community and their loss will leave a big hole in our lives. >> covering this story and then the kansas city chiefs story, you wonder what in the world is going on? what drives people to do that. when they do horrific things like that, you know they're disturbed, somehow disturbed individuals with a whole lot going on that people don't know about. the college doing anything to help people who knew the victims here? >> i spo
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